Sean's Holiday TV Tip - Mankind

DISCLAIMER:

I don't need to tell you to watch Frosty the Snowman, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Raindeer or any Andy Williams specials.

Merry Christmas!

sp

M

ankind -

the Story of All of Us

is a top shelf series for your holiday, or whenever you can, must watch list. Perfect for kids young and old when they might gather 'round the warm glow of a flat screen over these holidays following a home cooked meal. Any episode is a standalone masterpiece, but worth noting was a freakishly incredible growth spurt for Mankind once Ben Franklin flew a kite during a lightning storm in the 1700's. All that and more alone is worth catching up on in less than the time it takes to miss a couple quarters of football. Then there was a cholera outbreak, the internet and a bunch of other important stuff in the 300 years since.

My Takeaway = Highly Recommended:

Watch Now

or Record

If If you like snacking on self-cooked humble pie while you learn, the expertly produced 

Mankind

makes bitching about paying for peanuts on an airplane during a few hour flight across the USA seem prettty damn whiny.

See Through No More

What can you say? Sometimes images go in and words come out. As was the case when I stumbled upon the painting below.

A bit of prose, then, why don't we...

How's this day going to differ

From those gone past

When my ghosts again come hither?

Can never be extinguished

Don't know extinct

Eternal flames burn indistinguished

Take that first step through to the last

While blinding eyes pierce through to my past

And like a cracked peep hole in the door

My soul will be see through no more

- s. paxton

This imagery reminds of a bit I wrote about dancing with my own demons. When they come a creeping, lusting to take you in their arms and swing ya 'round, you had better lead...

   Painting, "A Dance With Demons" by Nancy Miller

Painting, "A Dance With Demons" by Nancy Miller

Hometown Screening of Tarpon Documentary

After special screenings at the Boca Grande Community Center Auditorium and Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium's Immersion Cinema in Sarasota, we are pleased to announce the public release of, "Rich History...Priceless Future - the Tarpon of Boca Grande Pass". Presented by the Boca Grande Area Chamber of Commerce and produced by Think Out Loud Productions, this educational short film and documentary preview can now be viewed and shared. We encourage everyone to watch this important film which features local personalities and experts, and to stay tuned for news about the upcoming full-length documentary on this important and evolving story. For more information, please contact Lew Hastings at 941-964-0568 or visit BocaGrandeChamber.com and ThinkOutLoudProductions.com.

Click to Play ...

Florida Sets Major Precedent In Shark Conservation

Larger Image

That is not a Photoshop trick, and I understand why that may not seem very relevant; without a little context, that is. I captured the image on November 16, 2011 in Key Largo Florida. Aside from being something you don't see every day; a hammerhead shark hanging from a crane several stories in the air with the International "Do Not" icon spray painted on its side, it's the timing that provides some ponderous meaning.

I spotted it while driving to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Meeting with my brother, Brooks, where the FWC would be voting on proposed rule changes that, if passed, would prohibit the recreational and commercial harvest, landing and sale of great, smooth and scalloped hammerheads, as well as tiger sharks in Florida's state waters. These major changes would no doubt have significant positive impacts on the long-term conservation of these animals. It could be said there was a lot Hanging in the Balance. Brooks and I made the 500-mile, same day round trip and hooked up down there with some of our key collaborators. We were all prepared to testify in front of the Commission, as to why we were in favor of the rule changes. For us and some others, it would be our third such meeting on the issue this year around the state.

This has been a hotly debated issue, but in the end, the Commission voted unanimously to pass the rule changes. We extend a special round of applause to the Commission for their careful deliberations of this matter, for taking our views and opinions into consideration, and for leveraging the kind of forward-thinking action and bold decision-making that will go far in establishing important conservation precedent. To all friends and collaborators who joined us and did more than just stand around to wait and see what others might do or what might happen, our hats off to you.

We'll double-check to make sure we get all the names spelled right, but for now, this is "The Crew"

As for the hammerhead image at the top of this entry, call it coincidence, but if a picture is worth a thousand words, then that is one of the most interesting shots I've had the pleasure of pushing the button on. Pretty much says it all.

One final note. It's on the official record, but we've had a lot of people ask exactly what it is that Brooks and I say at these meetings so we'll post a copy of it here and let you know when it's up. In the meantime, and in summary, "We do not condone purely wasteful practices". Here are a few more images from the meeting.

Sean Paxton delivers testimony, as part of a long list of those "in favor"

Brooks Paxton steps up

Zach Miller steps up ...

And the list of those in favor continued from what the Commission referred to as "many pages" of names. For the record, there was one opposed.


 

Shark Bro's Footage - NBC Today Show

Some Shark Bros' Think Out Loud Productions footage was used this morning on the NBC Today Show to help tell this bull shark attack story. Our buddies and long-time NBC Correspondent, Kerry Sanders & Producer / Videographer Vince Genova, were recently in town producing this piece about the recent incident. A special shout out to our friend, Dr. Bob Hueter, for reminding Kerry who to call when he needed a little bull shark footage. You'll see Dr. Bob's expertise featured in the piece.

Oh, yeah, on the whole sharks and responsible media reporting topic - another time. And on being surprised that a spearfishermen was bitten while spearfishing - another time, on that, too. Let's just all be happy about a happy ending for a change, ok?

As Always - Keep it W!LD - The Bros

VIEW REPORT BELOW

Shark Bros Support The Freedom to Read

What do the books: Gone With the Wind, For Whom The Bell Tolls and A Clockwork Orange all have in common? At one point, they were banned in some way, shape or form somewhere; in some cases, more profoundly than others. September 24 to October 1 is Banned Books Week - a National Celebration of the Freedom to Read.

My brother Brooks and I are big proponents of education, and of course, reading. As part of banned books week, we were invited by our local library, here in North Port, FL to take part in promoting all that and some censorship awareness. So here's the deal. The public voted for their favorite on a list of banned books, including the ones mentioned above. The most popular was picked to be read aloud by invited members of the community. The Pulitzer-Prize winning novel, "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee grabbed the most votes. Some may remember the movie adaptation starring Gregory Peck. He won an Oscar for it.

We support our library whenever possible and this was an interesting opportunity to do so while giving censorship in America a run for its money. If you're looking for something different to do during your lunch hour today, come on down to the North Port Library. I'll be reading "To Kill A Mockingbird" from 12:30 - 1pm. Elaine Allen Emerich kicked it off this morning at 10:30. City Commissioners and prominent members of the business and local community will be taking pages till we close the book later this afternoon. -stp-

Juvenile White Shark - Venice, CaliFlorida?

This popped up on my facebook, thanks to good friend, Mike aka Mr. Bigfoot. The Youtube video claim speaks for itself. I'm not a marine biologist, but I did sleep at a Holiday Inn last night and know what it looks like. Grey on top, white on bottom, caudal keel, etc., etc. It would only be very welcome and interesting news here on the SW Florida coast or is that Venice, California? Depite the vague Youtube post and conflicting early Google hits, a closer look at the pier -- and all the surfers means the left coast did make more sense. Anyhoo, and either way, hats off to those involved in releasing what appears to be a her back to the wild -- a refreshing change from what we saw carried out recently in California.

GW-A1-580.jpg
VIEW VIDEO BELOW

What Are Your $harks Worth?

After somewhat of a cliffhanger at the recent FWC meeting in Naples, I took some time to digest it all before making the point here. My brother Brooks and I would like to thank Josh Olive, Editor of The Waterline Magazine, for inviting this commentary and opinion. Here's a little background on the article.

Much to the surprise of those in attendance earlier this month at the FWC meeting, a ban on the recreational and commercial harvest of tiger sharks, as well as smooth, scalloped and great hammerhead sharks is still very much undecided by those in power, but it was compelling public testimony from both sides of the issue that made it so. With a scant three minutes of allowable testimony, per speaker, it can be a challenge addressing complex issues like this. Somehow every word has to count. In this case, as the discussion was winding down, the subject veered into areas that I would describe as having divergent relevance. At that point, when all you can do is listen, it can be hard resisting the temptation to scratch a hole in your head.

So here we are again, standing at the crossroads of another important wildlife management issue, here in Florida. Taking the stage and stealing the spotlight, as they often do, are some of our most prized and invaluable marine resources – sharks, and the State's proposal of increased protective measure for 4 key species. The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission will be slamming the gavel on this matter in November. It’s time to ask the question, “What Are Your $harks Worth?”

VIEW ARTICLE´╗┐

FWC - Proposed Shark Protection

FWC News Release

Thursday, September 08, 2011

Media contact: Aaron Podey, 850-487-0554

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) on Thursday advanced its long-standing policy to protect stressed shark populations in Florida waters. The action came during the second day of its three-day meeting in Naples.

Sharks have been strictly regulated in Florida since 1992, with a one-shark-per-person, two-sharks-per-vessel daily bag limit for all recreational and commercial harvesters; a ban on shark finning; and a prohibition on roughly two dozen overfished, vulnerable or rare shark species.

"Florida has been recognized as a pioneer and a leader in shark management efforts for nearly 20 years," said FWC Chairman Kathy Barco. "We recognize that maintaining healthy shark populations is critical to the sustainability of our marine ecosystem. The additional protections we are proposing would help preserve Florida's valuable marine resources."

The Commission proposes protecting four additional shark species that rely on Florida's productive coastal waters for their survival. The FWC's proposed rules would prohibit harvest of scalloped hammerheads, great hammerheads, smooth hammerheads and tiger sharks from state waters. Scalloped hammerheads are considered overfished and are experiencing overfishing, which means that fishing pressure is too high to be sustainable. Research indicates the other three species have also suffered severe population declines in recent decades.

In addition to the proposed rules, the Commission directed staff to work with stakeholders and anglers to develop an educational campaign highlighting proper fishing and handling techniques when catching and releasing sharks. Commissioners also asked staff to explore a trophy tag program for these important sharks. The tag, similar to the one used for tarpon, would allow anglers to harvest a shark for record purposes.

A final public hearing on the proposed shark rules will be during the November FWC meeting in Key Largo.

Our Response to Sea Shepherd Volunteer Questions

Several questions were recently posed by one empassioned individual, relavent to an important aspect of our conservation and educational outreach work in the realm of shark release fishing. The most important and central to all was:

"How can you justify what you guys do?"

Not that we feel a need to justify what we do, but to which we responded:

Judging from your established tone and firmly entrenched position, we wouldn't bet on your interests in what we have to say or what we do as being sincere, but out of respect for your question, here goes.

Commercial or recreational fishing for sharks isn't likely to stop during our lifetimes. Reality. While commercial fishing, especially industries supplying the voracious demand of the Asian fin trade are the undeniable leading cause for the decline in some key shark populations, recreational fishing is also a fractional and tangible contributor to that unenviable trend.

With that said, we're interested in reversing this trend where we can, and with the means and resources we have. Tangible results, as opposed to altruistic acts of futility are what we're interested in. Thus, we're pleased to say that, since we began this work many years ago, as a curiously coincidental or direct result of our collaborative efforts, a number of traditional kill tournaments have either: ceased operations, converted to release formats, have adopted best practices like circle hooks and heavier tackle to reduce fight times or created enhanced release divisions with the ultimate goal of converting to all-release. All the while, as was the case with billfish decades ago, we're proud to be successfully promoting a heightened and ever-increasing respect for these animals within and beyond the sport fishing community. There are no quick fixes for real life challenges like this and it’s not for everyone, but it needs doing.

As you suggest, we could have chosen to do nothing, but our efforts at modifying a culture in forward-thinking ways that are more compelling than repelling (for instance, as opposed to using tactics like good ol' fashioned and largely ineffective protesting) have saved countless sharks. Is it perfect? We suggest no such a thing exists. Otherwise, doing nothing might actually be the best thing to do, but again, that's not what drives us.

Although Utopian longings for a world where, in someone's opinion, everything would be as it subjectively should be, are to be admired, the likelihood of those visions coming to fruition, as a practical matter is ... unlikely. In this case, a world where sharks are not sought after in any way, shape or form for their inherent food or game qualities.

We can't say for sure where you're from, but as Americans, we hold a high respect for anyone's right and willingness to disagree with us and we're also smart enough to know when to get out of our own way. In this case, it's not you we're trying to reach. That would be Utopian thinking on our part, and therefore, an abusive and wasteful act of futility. In closing, we applaud your passion, respect but disagree with your opinions, and hope that whatever work you're doing might someday also bear the tangible fruits of change.

Happy Shark Week,
Sean Paxton
Brooks Paxton II

Shark Brothers Help Support Hometown Library

Shark Week at the North Port Library Features Special Appearance by the Shark Brothers.

Engaging and interactive multi-media presentation leverages purposeful entertainment to inspire and educate.

Sponsored in Part With the Generous Support Of
Carla & Rod Pawich and the North Port Location of:

For Immediate Release: 07-23-11

Following an engagement at the Florida Aquarium in Tampa on August 3rd, the presentation, "Sharks - From Fear to Fascination", comes to the North Port Library on August 6th, 2011. This live event is produced and hosted by long-time local residents, Sean and Brooks Paxton, who will be sharing their personal wildlife interaction experiences and conservation work with sharks and the marine environment.

L-R: Sean Paxton and Brooks Paxon

The Brother’s unique perspective on these animals began in their youth during fishing trips with their grandfathers on the Chesapeake Bay. Then, in 1975, after watching the movie, Jaws, their heightened fascination with sharks would lead them on a path to their current careers in educational entertainment.

In their roles as cameramen and producers, the brothers are directly involved in most of the action they shoot and document, which provides this live presentation with a punctuated array of video footage and photos captured by them during collaborations on historically significant documentary projects, science and research expeditions, pioneering shark-release events and personal adventures.

 “It’s a different kind of up-close-and-personal look at sharks and the environment that has something for everyone including the kids and kids at heart”, says Brooks Paxton. His brother, Sean adds, “It’s hard to believe this is the 24th season of Shark Week. We can remember the very first one like it was yesterday.” Both agree, “We see an increase in calls and inquiries from the press and media this time of the year so it presents a fine opportunity to capitalize on the heightened round of annual shark awareness created by the Discovery Channel. For us, it’s yet another chance to promote an accurate portrayal of sharks to the public, along with an important message about the need to protect and conserve these Very Important Predators © or V.I.P.’s, as we like to call them. We’re proud to be partnering with the local business community and the North Port Library to do just that. Libraries are an important cornerstone in any community lucky enough to have one, making them one of the best places to promote curiosity, learning and education, especially within our youthful population.”

When
August 6th, 2011 at 1:30pm 

Where
The North Port Library 13800 S. Tamiami Trail (US 41) North Port, FL 34287

Admission
FREE

Online Registration

Contact & Additional Information
The Paxton Brothers: 941-416-1788 / 5073, PaxtonBrothers@ThinkOutLoudProductions.com
North Port Library: (941) 861-1300, http://suncat.co.sarasota.fl.us/libraries/northport.aspx

What to Bring
The entire family, a sense of adventure and a camera.

Shark Bros Thank Hometown Magazine

We'd like to thank the folks at ROI Media, North Port Magazine and Jessica Pilkins for taking the interest and investing the time in writing this piece. Although, we've traveled to all parts of the globe in the time since, we've called North Port home since the late 1900's! 1978, to be exact. No matter where we go on the land or in the sea, this is where we've called home since leaving our ancestral roots in Western Pennsylvania. This community is important to us so we really appreciate this article and hope you enjoy it. Please pick up a copy when you see it or subscribe by visiting them online at: ROIMedia.com

Click on Image Below to View Aritcle:

Shark Brothers + Shark Week = Educational Entertainment

Shark Week at the Florida Aquarium to Feature Special Appearance by the Shark Brothers.

Engaging and interactive multi-media presentation leverages purposeful entertainment to inspire and educate.

PRESENTED BY: Wells Fargo

Click on Image to Enlarge

For Immediate Release: 07-21-11

In their presentation, "Sharks - From Fear to Fascination", North Port, Florida residents, Sean and Brooks Paxton, share their personal wildlife interaction experiences and conservation work with sharks and the marine environment.

The Brother’s unique perspective on these animals began in their youth during fishing trips with their grandfathers on the Chesapeake Bay. Then, in 1975, after watching the movie, Jaws, their heightened fascination with sharks would lead them on a path to their current careers in educational entertainment.

In their roles as cameramen and producers, the brothers are directly involved in most of the action they shoot and document, which provides this live presentation with a punctuated array of video footage and photos captured by them during collaborations on historically significant documentary projects, science and research expeditions, pioneering shark-release events and personal adventures.

L-R: Sean Paxton and Brooks Paxton

“It’s a different kind of up-close-and-personal look at sharks that has something for everyone”, says Brooks Paxton. His brother, Sean adds, “It’s hard to believe this is the 24th season of Shark Week. We can remember the very first one like it was yesterday.” Both agree, “We see an increase in calls and inquiries from the press and media this time of the year so it presents a fine opportunity to capitalize on the heightened round of annual shark awareness created by the Discovery Channel. For us, it’s yet another chance to promote an accurate portrayal of sharks to the public, along with an important message about the need to protect and conserve these Very Important Predators © or V.I.P.’s, as we like to call them. We’re especially proud to be invited by the Florida Aquarium this year to do just that, while helping to launch their 2011-2012 Evening Tide Talks season.”

When
August 3rd, 2011.
RSVP Required - Please Call 813-273-4568
Complimentary Reception and Meet & Greet at 5:45pm
Presentation at 6:15
Please enter through the Aquarium's Business Entrance

Where
The Florida Aquarium Auditorium located in Downtown Tampa

Admission
FREE

Contact & Additional Information
The Paxton Brothers: 941-416-1788 / 5073, PaxtonBrothers@ThinkOutLoudProductions.com
The Florida Aquarium: (813) 273-4000, FlaQuarium.org

What to Bring
The entire family, a sense of adventure and a camera.

What Today Really Means

Memorial Day is for those who have died fighting for priceless freedoms often taken for granted. It’s about coming together in honor of those who gave it all so we could pursue the opportunity to have it all. Remind those who may consider this just an extra day off from work or school - especially the kids. Then enjoy the time together and the freedom to do so. God Bless the USA and all her brave Warrior Patriots. -stp-

Consumed

The days of simply updating a blog or website are sadly over. Now, it seems, one post has to go in 10 places and unless you're 11-years old, who has that kind of time? For past 6-8 months, I've been consumed with live event production surrounding the Guy Harvey Ultimate Shark Challenge tournament and festival so it's been a little quiet on this site. For those not in the know, the Ultimate Shark Challenge is a little contribution I make, along with my co-consipirators, Brooks Paxton and Capt. Robert Moore. Together, we're allied with many other important collaborators from the worlds of sport, science and research, conservation, business and entertainment.

This year, we've further enhanced, and and are rolling out, some defined conservation initiatives and educational outreach programs, as part of the circus-like show we put on with the tournament and companion festival. It's all about promoting best practices for shark-release fishing and a responsible management ethic with regard to some of the marine world's Vitally Important Predators -- or what we like to call our VIP's.

Anyhoo, if you're into that sort of thing, there's a lot more information at the tournament website. Granted, I haven't spent much time posting here, but I've been busier than a rooster in a three-story hen house. Trust me. Once this project is over and the big top comes down on the afternoon of May 15th, we'll get back to a lot of other biz. In the meantime, here's some updates on what I've been up to the last little while, and a few more here. Thanks for stopping by and always remember, the grass may be greener on the other side, but somebody's still gotta mow it. -stp-

Uncommon Shark Sightings in Gulf

Last month, I posted news of a mako shark caught in Gulf waters well off the coast of Sarasota, FL and juvenile tiger sharks encountered in near shore waters off the same area. Not rare, by any stretch, but welcome signs. Lately, tiger sharks have been a little on the few and far between side here in SW Florida, compared to 20 or so years ago. A white shark was also rumored to have taken a speared Amberjack off the east coast of Florida earlier in the year.

Last Friday, then again yesterday, one of our tournament anglers phoned in a few pics of a species of shark he's been encountering over the last week off SW Florida. They were positively identified as finetooth sharks. In discussing them with Dr. Bob Hueter of Mote's Center for Shark Research, they are uncommon here, unlike the northern Gulf and off the southeast Atlantic coast.

Bob also tipped me off to what is indeed a rare sighting of a basking shark ... basking off a pier in Panama City, FL. Apparently, its been 30 years since another, larger basking shark was seen in the Gulf. In this case, there was a lucky kayaker close by. Talk about being in the right place at the right time.

Click Image to View Youtube Video

 

Warm Weather, Tigers, Makos and ... Whites?

Air temps here in SW Florida are already about 20 degrees warmer than this time last year, and are actually above historical averages. Gulf water temps are also notably higher than 12 months ago. With other factors like the BP oil disaster and Mother Nature having a mind of her own aside, the two unsubstantiated fish stories below deserve mention and some consideration. Either way, I'd like to think so.  - stp-

On Thursday, I got a call from a solid source on Florida's east coast that an 80-pound amberjack was snatched from a spear fisherman less than a mile offshore by a 12 - 14 foot white shark. When the alleged hi-jacking took place, the lucky angler was involved in the routine task of retrieving his speared catch in approximately 80 feet of water. Those in the know would agree, the next best suspect would be a mako, but the first-hand, eye-witness source is convinced otherwise. Either way, a big mako or a smallish white well inside the Gulf Stream is intriguing.

This morning, I caught wind of a report, and then confirmed that a mako shark exceeding 700 pounds was taken approximately 30 miles off the coast of Sarasota by a split charter group on board the 'Big Catch' of the Flying Fish Fleet yesterday. While cleaning the mako, a fully intact blacktip shark of about 65 pounds was discovered amongst the stomach contents, adding to the total estimated weight, which was calculated using the following measurements.

I spoke with a representative of the Flying Fish Fleet and confirmed this shark was 116 inches at the fork with a 68 inch girth, and had a total length between 11 and 12 feet. There was no scale on site to accurately handle a fish of this size. FORMULA USED = Girth Squared (68 x 68 = 4624) times Fork Length (116 inches) Divided by 800 = Total Estimated Weight of: 670 Pounds plus the Consumed Blacktip (65 Pounds) = 735 Pounds.

"A great big fish, indeed" -- according to founding members of the All-Star Rod & Gun Club

Tigers, mostly smaller juveniles, have also been caught just off the beaches around Sarasota in recent weeks, and finally, in talking with my brother, Brooks, and pro guides like Capt. Robert Moore, there have been credible reports that mature makos and other larger, but similar-looking species; have been snatching amberjack from angler's lines off the coast of Boca Grande, just to our south.

This could be an interesting year.

Sean Paxton is a self-confessed throwback adventurer who enjoys cold dinners out of a can, loosely planned expeditions to the middle of nowhere and long dives with sharks. He can fashion a tourniquet out of any necktie, prefers A1-Sauce over Gray Poupon and skirt steaks that are just a little pink in the middle. Contact: Sean@ThinkOutLoudProductions.com

2011 Blacktip Challenge All-Release Shark Tournament

The 3rd Blacktip Challenge All-Release, Land-Based Shark Fishing Tournament will be held February 24th - 27th on Florida's east coast. ‘
Land-Based Shark Fishing’ is defined as ‘Attempting to capture sharks using a rod, reel, line, and hooks from the land or anything attached to it. For example: a beach, jetty, pier or bridge.

Tournament Creator & Director, Josh Jorgensen, is an avid and lifelong angler from Canada who's also a staunch proponent of conservation-minded fishing. After catching the shark bug, he put on his first Blacktip Challenge in 2008. It was well attended and received, but before it was over, he was already thinking about ways to take it all just a little bit further. That's when my brother Brooks and I received a call.

After some productive and like-minded discussions, we worked directly with Josh to expand the 2009 tournament beyond the increasingly popular ‘CPR’ (or catch, photograph & release) format he promoted in 2008 with added steps to qualify catches that included measurement taking for use in estimated weight formulas, and most notably, the application of conventional research-tracking tags, prior to the release of all animals back to the wild. After re-writing the rules to include not only these requirements but to include step-by-step instructions for the proper tagging, documentation and release of sharks, we joined him and Thomas Kieras as Co-Tournament Directors and Research Coordinators.

On location, the Paxton Brothers document one of many blacktip sharks released in the BTC

For this weeklong event, Brooks and I ditched the fishing gear and took on another familiar role as cameramen and producers. In a partnership with Josh, we set out to capture not only the expected amped-up, expeditionary fishing action, but the more important story behind all that salt spray and adrenalin.

In this case, we shot a purely authentic example of passionate sportsmen and women pursuing their long-established and unique angling style in an organized competitive event while promoting a spirit of responsibility and respect for the environment. Being from this close-knit angling community, it came as no surprise to us. Links to video segments below.

We're proud of our close collaborations with people like Josh because he's doing something important. In this case, answering a growing demand from recreational anglers at an important time.

Although, not the first, he's one of a few standout trendsetters to come along in recent years that has taken careful steps to maintain and preserve the integrity of a sport enjoyed by many, while taking even bigger strides to ensure the responsible handling and release of all sharks caught and released; all the while taking opportunistic steps to make valuable scientific contributions.

Brooks and I know first-hand that's one hell of a juggling act to think about, let alone pull off, but when its recognized and accepted, it's worth it. Never a dull moment, but worth it, nonetheless.  -stp-

VIDEO AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Watch 2011 Blacktip Challenge Promo

View Extended Blacktip Challenge Segment

BlacktipChallenge.com

Shark Catch, Tag, Release Field Guide